Sports in Education: CII Sports

India, with its large young population, increasing levels of opportunity, and with highly successful sporting leagues, is at the cusp of a sporting revolution. We are poised to take a giant leap – which can potentially catapult our standing on the world stage and create opportunities for employment.

The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) and Sattva strongly believe that the role of sports in holistic development and social inclusion has a ripple effect on socio-economic growth. Sattva is working closely with CII on the Making India Play Fund to realise its vision of bringing about a culture of sports in the country through the following actionable areas:

1. Evangelising sports with a strong emphasis on the grassroots level
2. Creating a culture of sports in schools through the formal education system
3. Optimal utilisation of sports infrastructure and efficient creation of new facilities
4. Enhancing the involvement of the corporate sector in scaling up the ‘business of sports’
5. Channelising corporate CSR funds for the development of sports.

SelectHER: Women in the Workforce

What would happen if 50% of the workforce in the world and in India were women?

. The world could add $12 trillion to GDP in 2025, doubling the contribution of women to global growth in the coming decade
. India alone can add $2.9 trillion to its GDP by fully bridging the gender gap in the workplace
. This means a 60% increase in GDP, than business-as-usual in 2025

What does this mean for Indian society?

. Gender equality in society
. Better education for future generations
. Improved family well being

Through our primary and secondary research, we have found that there is significant business value in hiring women, especially in customer experience roles.

. Gender-diverse business units have 14% higher revenue in retail and 19% higher average quarterly net profit in hospitality, as compared to less gender-diverse units.
. Women account for 85% of all consumer purchases including everything from autos to health care

Having quality talent in customer facing roles has become a priority for the high growth industries with a B2C focus.

. 89 percent of companies worldwide expect to compete mostly based on customer experience in 2016, versus 36 percent just five years ago
. The same is true for India as well, where 74% of the CXOs indicated that the importance of customer experience is growing within their company

Sattva embarked on a mission last year, along with Global Development Incubators and Trust for Retailers and Retail Associates of India (TRRAIN), supported by J.P. Morgan, to provide a high-quality pipeline of female candidates in customer experience roles for bridge-to-luxury retail brands.

Over the past year, we trained 100 women and placed 77%. However, the learnings were significant and we observed multiple demand-supply mismatches that were systemic by nature and cannot be solved by skill training alone.

There is a need for disruptive, holistic solution over and above skilling. Sattva is looking to solve this problem by moving the needle from a skilling-only solution to a systemic solution engaging stake-holders across the value-chain.

Key Tenets for SelectHER Phase 2:

. High-growth industries with future-focused customer-experience roles
Employer as Partner through the candidate life-cycle, over and beyond the “training” period alone
. On-the-Job employability skills to be the significant differentiator
. Leverage technology to reduce friction, information asymmetry

Stay tuned for more updates on the programme!

Micro-entrepreneurship

Sattva is working in collaboration with Smart Power India (SPI) to address issues of gender gaps and bringing rural women into mainstream employment through setting up a micro apparel-manufacturing centre. The centre aims to connect willing women to mainstream market by providing them training and sustained employment.

Sattva’s approach for the micro-apparel manufacturing centre is designed in such a way that it addresses the key problems of the rural communities of Uttar Pradesh highlighted above and tries to solve a small part of the larger unemployment and migration problems. The intention of the above micro enterprise development projects is to scale this business model to more and more villages and create a cluster of these micro apparel centres into a small-scale industries which provides employment to local communities and empowers women in the region.

Salient features of the apparel manufacturing centre:

1. The workforce to get at least 40% of the selling price on a per piece basis, which is much more than the current percentage of 10-20% of the selling price.
2. Women to form major percentage of the workforce in our centre
3. Entrepreneur driven centre in which the selected entrepreneur is from the community
4. The centre would be handed over to the community to be run by them in course of 2-3 years.

In other words, we are looking at this as a solution, i.e. more than just a “unit cost”, and enabling impact that has to go beyond measurement, to also look at scale + sustainability.

Primary Education: AVPN

1.5 million public schools
260 million enrolments
India – the world’s largest and most complex education system in the world.

With learning quality still being poor, multiple stakeholders – the government, charitable organisations, private funders, corporate entities — are all collaborating to bring about systemic transformation in the way education is delivered, in order to improve learning outcomes for millions of children.
You can also learn more about the current challenges, interventions and funding landscape in education in India in our report “Funding Education with Impact

SAFEBillion – Solutions for Arsenic & Fluoride Elimination

Extending access to safe drinking water is one of the major developmental challenges facing India. Approximately 85% of the rural population, comprised of more than 700 million people, are dependent on groundwater for drinking. With an increasing trend of excessive dependence on ground water, ground water scarcity and contamination are now a major concern.

Arsenic and Fluoride Contamination in India

Arsenic is a highly toxic element and a known carcinogen, and is present in high levels in groundwater across several states in India. Since the early 2000s, there have been multiple reports of contamination in ground water sources across the country, but most prominently along the populous Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra stretch. The WHO has labelled it “the largest mass poisoning in recorded history”.

Of the 85 million tons of natural fluoride deposits on the earth’s crust, it is estimated that almost 12 million are in India. High fluoride contamination has already been observed across 22 States and more than 200 districts, potentially putting 60 million people at risk. Consumption of fluoride contaminated water causes Fluorosis, which is a crippling disorder– resulting in irreversible deformities and illnesses.

Technology Solutions

Although there are numerous technology solutions to these problems, many of them are expensive and/or ineffective at decreasing arsenic and fluoride levels in drinking water to acceptable levels. And while some solutions have proven to be effective in labs, few have been distributed in the field and even fewer appear to be sustainable in the long-term.

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs have developed two methods to remove arsenic and fluoride from drinking water, affordably and effectively. Electro-Chemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR), an arsenic removal technique, uses a small amount of electricity to create rust in contaminated water. The rust binds to arsenic, which can then be removed from the water through settling and/or filtration. The second method, SAFR- Safe & Affordable Fluoride Removal Technology, uses minimally processed (dried/milled) bauxite ore as an inexpensive adsorbent for remediating fluoride contamination. Initial lab tests showed that fluoride remediation with the best-performing Guinea bauxite was ∼23–33 times less expensive than with activated alumina.

Both technologies have been designed community-backwards: they use materials that are locally sourced and affordable, highly effective, technically feasible and are robust in rural settings – they require minimal manpower to operate and maintain the system.

SAFEBillion – A consortium for providing safe drinking water at scale

Given the systemic nature of these problems, we believe it is imperative to work with multiple stakeholders, partners and a diverse set of organisations in order to achieve impact at scale. SAFEBillion is a consortium with the goal of solving the problem of Arsenic and Fluoride contamination in India.

The consortium consists of: Piramal Sarvajal, INREM Foundation and Sattva.

While technology forms only a part of the overall solution, there are multiple components required to make a solution work on the ground.

Sattva’s Solution will look at –

-The number of people with access to clean drinking water

-Improvement in health metrics

-New knowledge created

The goal is to take this technology from a lab solution to a field solution; and over the next three years field test, build and operate this technology and develop a model that can be scaled.

if you want to know more about the solution or partner with us please mail us at: impact@sattva.co.in

Skilling Solutions: Future Forward Skills Mission

Sattva launched the Future Forward Skills Mission in partnership with Tata Trusts and the UKIBC.

The Mission aims to catalyse market-based employability solutions that address the aspirations of India’s young workforce and make them future-ready. It is open for non-profits, trusts and societies that have an established proof of concept for a skilling solution. The Mission provides funding, mentoring, implementation support and capability building to the awardees.

The impact of the solution will be evaluated based on the – number of people employed/ self-employed, their income premium and the number of skilling organisations which have become sustainable.

ADVISORY – SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS

OBJECTIVE
A group of social entrepreneurs developing technology innovations to optimise water usage for food production were looking to take their idea to market. They wanted to develop a robust business model in order to create impact in emerging economies. In our role as advisors, we helped these founders take ideas off the ground supported by a right business model, go-to-market strategy, and execution to scale their efforts.

SATTVA’S VALUE-ADD
As advisors our primary role with these entrepreneurs, whose innovations were mostly at seed or early stages of development, was to develop an actionable strategy to grow their venture from idea to market. We worked with them closely to establish the best business model to validate their innovations as well as identify the ideal consumer base in every market. We designed a business model strategy for three to five years which included correct pricing to ensure a product-market fit for long-term sustainability. Our mission was to condition entrepreneurs with business thinking and this involved working proactively with them to zero down on the core value-proposition of their product. Once they hit the market we delved into specific capacity building around sales, marketing, operational planning, financial forecasting and partnership strategy for the foreseeable future. From June 2016 we have meticulously helped these entrepreneurs move through each stage of their journey to reach the ultimate end goal of impact on the ground.

KEY LEARNINGS
We documented our actionable strategy for each aspect of business and entrepreneurship in a playbook which we believe can be customised for use by any innovator in the ecosystem. This knowledge material is a valuable asset for all players in the sector. Alongside, we contributed to change the mindset of social entrepreneurs to prove that innovations can lead to viable and sustainable businesses. Also, we were able to give them actionable strategies to survive and scale ventures, thereby boosting overall confidence in the sector. Innovators were able to strengthen their go-to-market strategy and capacities for next three-five years.

HIGHLIGHTS
Number of entrepreneurs advised: 12
10 Regions covered: Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Kenya, South Africa, Bangladesh, India, Cambodia, Vietnam and Nepal
Innovations included: Seed tape, affordable green-house technology, contract farming, precision agricultural devices, and weather management phone service

IMPLEMENTATION – MICRO-ENTREPRENEURSHIP

OBJECTIVE
A solar power company delivering viable electricity solutions through decentralised renewable energy mini-grids, wanted to spur socio-economic growth in rural and semi-urban areas. They wanted to create an ecosystem to encourage this segment of people to become entrepreneurs on the back of reliable supply of energy. Our work as knowledge and implementation partners was to bring rural women into mainstream employment through setting up of micro-apparel manufacturing centres.

SATTVA’S APPROACH
We designed and executed a programme based on an entrepreneur-led model here. The first step was developing a site selection framework using certain basic criteria:
– choosing a location for the manufacturing centre close to a solar plant to ensure a steady supply of electricity, – within a radius of 200 kilometres from the market,

The focus was on selecting married women to train since the study suggested that such selection would help maintain high retention rates. We covered 8-10 villages under outreach to encourage women to visit the centre and gauge their interest in joining the programme. Selected candidates were charged a monthly sum of Rs 100 to ensure accountability and retention. This 20-seater centre, in Kamalapur near Lucknow, trained women in apparel making over six months. Our on-ground training partner trained women to use automatic machines. Post this we worked on a job-order model securing bulk orders from vendors (wholesalers or retailers) in Lucknow which in turn were executed by these women over the next few months as part of on-the job training.

KEY LEARNINGS
The program had far reaching socio-economic impact as it saw women from orthodox families venture out of home into mainstream employment. As a result they were now empowered to improve personal livelihood and educational aspirations. In parallel, it highlighted the importance of creating market linkages for rural entrepreneurs as a crucial component for any skilling program. Our approach demonstrated that a well-designed model is imperative, but motivating and building trust with women is as important to mobilise them. During the course of the programme we saw women build personal relationships with each other and work together with complete solidarity. The company was able to make the first crucial step in solving problems of migration, gender gap in mainstream livelihood opportunities and unemployment in Uttar Pradesh. The Kamlapur centre served as the anchor in that area, enabling the energy service company to be sustainable enough to provide energy at community level covering more beneficiaries. Also, the client is now confident of replicating the model for similar projects in other locations.

OUTCOME
No. of women in program: 20 women
Centre location: Kamlapur, Uttar Pradesh
Increase average income: Rs 2000-3000 per month from Rs 200 per month
Age bracket: 21+ years

PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT – SKILLING

OBJECTIVE
A global social development incubator had developed a programme, funded by a large investment bank, to improve gender diversity ratios and quality of candidates entering the retail sector. This was a one-of-a-kind innovative pilot programme designed to upskill and employ underprivileged women at premium and luxury retail brands in India. We played a key role as programme management partners to deliver and manage the programme in Mumbai and Bengaluru.

SATTVA’S VALUE ADD
In order to reach the desired outcome for the customer and other stakeholders, we needed to ensure that the programme developed was aligned to the market. So, we built a training curriculum based on feedback we got from two large market players who gave us an outside in perspective. The curriculum focused on English skills and conditioning women to nuances of the retail sector — customer service, understanding the segment, corporate brand sensitisation. This was co-developed by the on-ground training partner. Our role was focused on pre-screening and evaluating fitment to the programme based on select criteria – educational qualification, basic English proficiency, and alignment to retail sector. Alongside, we actively engaged with potential employers in the market who gave us feedback on gaps in training and other value-adds needed, if any.

KEY LEARNINGS
This two-month long programme clearly identified that training candidates on high quality customer service for premium and luxury brands, has a definite advantage over mere English proficiency even though the latter is a key requirement. Training women on softer aspects – confidence, communication, presentability – helps them engage with customers better and eventually find employment opportunities across sectors. As the next step in our endeavour, we are now looking to expand to other aspirational industries which value customer experience as a core skill.
It also gave us and other stakeholders useful insights about this segment of women. For instance, most women or their families don’t want to be associated with retail due to long shifts and physical labour involved. Many came in to learn English therefore mobilisation was a key challenge. These findings helped us relook at the programme to bring in more value-additions. The duration, for one, was not enough to build both English and soft skills. As added benefit, the company was able to assess the aspirant needs better from the programme. Overall, these insights helped develop skill sets for candidates to be more aligned with demands of this job.

OUTCOME
No. of women trained: 34
No. undergoing training: 37
Placement rate: 76%
Average salary: Rs 11,000 in Mumbai and Rs 10,500 in Bengaluru
Companies placed: Fossil, Madura Fashion, W, FabIndia, Reliance Trends, Tata Trent, Louis Philippe, Aurelia, Shoppers Stop.
Educational qualification: Std 12th and Graduates

IMPLEMENTATION – SCALABLE EDUCATION MODELS

OBJECTIVE
An international philanthropic foundation is looking to develop a technology-based scalable model to evaluate whether Spoken English Skills (SES) leads to an increase in employability of urban poor youth. We played a key role as implementation and programme management partners to help them deliver this programme on the ground for 7,000 students across six states.

SATTVA’S METHODOLOGY
We designed a technology-enabled programme to help the foundation reach its goal of creating a low-cost scalable model to improve English proficiency among college students. We started with a detailed study of technology-based solutions for English in the form of mobile apps, and then looked at products specifically catering to the job market. We shortlisted five technology partners based on the following parameters: alignment with the job seeker segment, ability to cater to scale, management capabilities, cost, interface, and specific features like gamification, incentivisation etc. The programme required students to speak in English for 15 minutes a day for three months leading to a consumption of 40 hours of technology-based content.
We then worked with four training partners working present in this segment to add our programme into their training modules as a supplement. Our application partners sent us weekly dashboards with data on time spent by students per week, content consumed per week, how often they logged in. The training partners helped us monitor their attendance in class. Post this we collected and analysed end results to assess levels of improvement with students.

KEY LEARNINGS
This programme demonstrated that a technology-enabled training model can be used as a low-cost method to scale and be replicated by others in the ecosystem. Through our efforts at designing, implementing and managing it, we gained several insights into the segment which are useful points for anyone who wants to adopt this model. We observed that this population of college students was extremely conscious of data usage and therefore the apps we selected needed to have offline functionality. Also, most students preferred gamification as this motivated them to compete with classmates. The foundation had a two-pronged vision through this programme – one was to make students more employable and second to create a scalable model covering an entire state.

OUTCOME
States covered: Haryana, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Rajasthan
Scale: 7,000 students
Technology Partners: 5
On-Ground Training Partners: 4