Can you Predict the Future?

Can you Predict the Future?

– By Arnab Mukherjee

Kings dethroned

Nokia, a household name in the mobile phone industry in the early 2000s, took rapid strides to emerge as market leader in the mobile phone industry in a short span of time with ~40% market share at one point. However, its fall from the summit was as swift as its rise. One of the key reasons attributed to its failure was its inability to foresee the future disruption of the mobile industry by smart phones.

Kodak, the King of photography for large parts of the 20th century, after years of decline finally filed for bankruptcy in 2012. Kodak failed to see potential in the technology that it itself had invented…digital photography!

Disruptions however are nothing new. More than 100 years ago, the Ford Motor Company revolutionized transportation through the mass production of the automobile which disrupted several industries, including wagon and carriage businesses.

In more recent times, e-commerce, the sharing economy, alternative media platforms such as Netflix have all disrupted traditional business models.

Innovative business models however are not the only source of disruption. Increasingly, forces such as extreme weather events, climate change, geopolitical instability, and even global pandemics (as we witness now) are emerging as severe threats to businesses.

You can read the full article, here.

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Arnab Mukherjee is a Senior Knowledge Manager at Sattva. He drives knowledge management within Sattva and engages with clients on building sustainable businesses for them. He holds more than a decade of experience in knowledge and research in top management consulting firms in the domains of supply chain and corporate strategy.

Sattva has been working with various corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals and maximise the return on social investment. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. Several corporates have been a partner to many such collaborations where effective CSR programmes have strategically aligned with business and have provided meaningful solutions to social issues.

● Talk to us: impact@sattva.co.in

charcha 2020

charcha 2020

Sattva hosted the Financial Inclusion track at “charcha 2020” – a platform for the Indian development sector to come together and chart a course for the country’s resurgence from the COVID-19 crisis, launched by The/Nudge Foundation. The platform brought together practitioners, thinkers, enablers, community leaders, policy makers to take on the challenges ahead with conviction and clarity.

As part of our Financial Inclusion track we had a range of sessions. Key insights and takeaways from these sessions can be accessed below.

14 May 2020:

Click here for the video link for Day 1

15 May 2020:

Click here for the video link for Day 2

16 May 2020:

Click here for the video link for Day 3

About charcha 2020:
The whole world is in lockdown now, grappling with the full impact of Covid-19. According to some estimates, 200 million people will be pushed into poverty in India this year, and the development sector will undergo an unprecedented resource crunch. There is an urgent need for the sector to come together and strategize in a timely manner on charting an agile course at a time when the country needs us the most.

The leading nonprofits, foundations and industry experts came together for charcha 2020 – bringing together practitioners, thinkers, enablers, community leaders and policymakers across 14 parallel events to take on the challenges ahead with conviction and clarity.

More here: charcha 2020 – Sattva and Financial Inclusion

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Sattva has been working with various non-profits and social organisations as well as corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. We assist organisations in formulating their long-term social impact strategy by strategically aligning with business to provide meaningful solutions to social issues.

We’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback. Do write to us: impact@sattva.co.in

COVID-19 in India – Public Healthcare Matters

COVID-19 in India – Public Healthcare Matters

The COVID pandemic has proven to be a great equaliser in some ways. Everyone is prone to infection and protecting only a few is of no consequence- universal protection and healthcare is the only way to control the pandemic. The need for a robust public healthcare system has never been more pressing. Exactly how fragile is our public healthcare system and the health of our population?

How fragile is our public healthcare infrastructure exactly?

The analysis that you can download here looks at the real numbers and the weakest links.

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Written by: Vrunda Bansode and Data analysis by: Veda Kulkarni

Powered by data from India Data Insights. Sattva Consulting has made all COVID-related data resources freely accessible here:

We’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback on this topic. Do write to us: impact@sattva.co.in

How can Non-profits Pivot Effectively while Dealing with the COVID-19 Crisis?

How can Non-profits Pivot Effectively while Dealing with the COVID-19 Crisis?

– By Roselin Dey

‘The toughest choice to make is between safety and service in these times of crisis’. The CEO of one of the largest non-profit organisations in India said this recently while rolling out their COVID-19 response strategy.

Non-profits specifically working in the development sector are witnessing a deep impact of COVID-19. On one hand, these non-profits are trying to support communities which are struggling with access to resources, health services and sustenance. On the other hand, donor attention and funds are getting diverted towards COVID-19 relief necessitating non-profits to re-evaluate their focus. In such times, non-profits face a difficult choice whether to continue with a constrained business-as-usual path or to pivot and work on community relief/response.

Financial sustainability is one of the primary drivers for this decision and hence having a discussion to build alignment with the strategic donors is the first step. Assuming that the funders are receptive to adapting their existing grants to work on COVID-19 response, non-profits should then see this as an opportunity to maximise social impact while leveraging core ethos and expertise.

Over the last few weeks, we have had the opportunity to work deeply with one such non-profit to support and co-create their response to COVID-19 crisis.

You can read the full article, here.

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Roselin Dey is a Senior Engagement Manager in the Non Profit Advisory team at Sattva. She works with high potential non-profits in designing and building solutions to enable high impact on the ground. She holds more than a decade of experience in strategy, partnerships development and program management with experience in domains of Sustainability, Social Impact, Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

Sattva has been working with various non-profits and social organisations as well as corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. We assist organisations in formulating their long-term social impact strategy by strategically aligning with business to provide meaningful solutions to social issues.

We’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback on this topic. Do write to us: impact@sattva.co.in

Enabling Equity in Classrooms in India

Enabling Equity in Classrooms in India

– By Farhan Shaikh

Equity as a construct propagates the core value of fairness and inclusion with a strong belief that all individuals deserve the available opportunities for development despite differences in background and personal abilities. Unlike the notion of ‘equality’ in education, where treatment of every child is expected to be the same before the learning process, ‘equity’ promotes redistribution of resources and teaching support for collective development within the classroom. Given the enormous diversity within a country like India, there have been remarkable initiatives like the Right to Education Act of 2009 and flagship schemes like Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan and mid-day meal which emphasises on education for all but does not necessarily solve for equity.

The latest Children in India Report by the Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Government of India, reveals alarming statistics on the dropout rates of girls and students belonging to other socially disadvantaged groups. There is a 30% reduction in enrolment of girls from grade 5 to grade 9.For public schools in rural and semi-urban areas, enrolment up to grade 8 remains high mainly due to the mid-day meal scheme and other government incentives for parents to send their children to school. With its high tribal population, Jharkhand has the highest dropout rate of close to 70% for school children.

You can read the full article, here.

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Farhan Shaikh works with the Program Advisory and Management team at Sattva that largely engages with large scale non-profit Foundations. His work so far has primarily focused on organisational development of non-profits, data driven research studies and strategic philanthropy. Farhan has been associated with the Education circle of Sattva to develop content that can provide key actionable insights on specific problem areas. He completed his Bachelors in Statistics and followed it up with a Young India Fellowship at Ashoka University (Post graduate diploma in Liberal Arts).

Sattva has been working with various non-profits and social organisations as well as corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. We assist organisations in formulating their long-term social impact strategy by strategically aligning with business to provide meaningful solutions to social issues.

We’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback on this topic. Do write to us: impact@sattva.co.in

Data and insights on CSR’s COVID-19 response

Data and insights on CSR’s COVID-19 response

A closer look at what the CSR community is thinking, and how their funds are being spent in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

India reported its first case of COVID-19 on January 30th, 2020, the same day the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared this a public health emergency of international concern. Up until the date of publishing this article, India had a total of 3,666 active cases with 109 deaths, with the expectation that numbers will increase across states in the coming days. The government has taken strict measures such as invoking the The Epidemic Diseases Act, 1897, the Disaster Management Act, 2005, and a countrywide lockdown, which started on March 24th for three weeks, and has just been extended for approximately three more weeks.

In addition, the Government of India recently declared that companies tackling the COVID-19 crisis would be eligible under the two percent CSR mandate 1 laid out in The Companies Act, 2013. The CSR spend on the COVID-19 response would come under items (i) and (xii) of Schedule VII relating to the promotion of healthcare, including preventive healthcare and sanitation, and disaster management. The CSR community has been quick to respond, with most committees and boards working overtime to speed up internal processes and get approvals for spends and additional budgets. In this article, we address some of the questions that companies frequently ask us.

1. How is the CSR community responding to COVID-19?
2. How do I maximise impact with my funding in the current situation? How do I decide between different options of funding?
3. Should I divert funding from my current programmes, especially if work is stalled due to the lockdown?
4. Workers and entrepreneurs associated with our value chains are vulnerable due to the pandemic. If we work towards rehabilitation of these affected communities, would it still be considered CSR?
5. How can I leverage my employees’ contributions for COVID-19 response? What are some of the avenues through which they can contribute?.

Read the article, originally published on India Development Review here.

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Sattva has been working with various corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals and maximise the return on social investment. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. We assist companies in formulating their long-term CSR strategy by strategically aligning with business to provide meaningful solutions to social issues. We look at short-term, medium-term and long-term outcomes while designing programmes. It is our endeavour to unlock the maximum return on investment for our clients. If you would like to know more about our programmes, please do write to us at impact@sattva.co.in

COVID-19: Our Response and Action

COVID-19: Our Response and Action

We realise that the current crisis is not a blip in our current operations, instead it will have a long-term impact on the sector and funding. While it is also not just a social sector crisis and has significant economic, political and social ramifications, this is also an opportunity for organisations to reassess their role in the social impact ecosystem. As an organisation focused on delivering impact, we are actively exploring, discussing and looking to co-create the right solutions at the point of need. We are part of collaboratives and collectives to ensure there is amplification and synergies between all support work.

At Sattva we are leveraging our experience and expertise in the ecosystem to combat COVID-19 through a four-pronged response. Here are some of these key measures we are taking:

1. ENGAGE

Sattva is engaging with the ecosystem to improve data-led decision making and provide better actionable insights to combat COVID-19.

COVID-19 Central Knowledge Hub – Funding and resource initiatives towards fighting COVID-19 in India are being announced everyday – government schemes, grants / in-kind donations by various entities, fundraising / resource requests from NGOs, hospitals and local government bodies. How do we keep track of it all? How do we understand who is funding what and how much? How do we understand what areas need resources? We at Sattva have built this dashboard to provide a macro perspective of all COVID-19 relief initiatives in India. Check it out here.

COVID-19 Our Response and Action – We are actively exploring, discussing and looking to co-create the right solutions at the point of need. We are part of collaboratives and collectives to ensure there is amplification and synergies between all support work. If you are a donor, non-profit or solution provider, talk to us: impact@sattva.co.in

Through our partners and directly, we are approaching governments and understanding their needs to see where we can support. We are also engaging with various collaboratives to see how we can collectively support the NGOs and create relevant solutions and responses to address the current crisis. We will continue to share resources from these collaboratives for your consumption.

2. ORCHESTRATE

We are currently collecting information from donors (corporate CSR, individual funders and philanthropic foundations) on their offers. Simultaneously, we are talking to a number of solutions providers (non-profits, social enterprises and businesses) to understand the solutions they can deliver on the ground. We are also in touch with Government agencies to get a view of the priorities. We have started putting the value chain together for maximum impact and the best reach. We request your help in the following ways:

If you are a donor, please provide information here.

If you are a non-profit/solution provider, please provide information here.

Read about our work in Ladakh, here.

Read about our work in Shillong, here.

3. ENABLE

As we continue to work with the same rigour to deliver on the projects, research, solutions and more that we have been working on for over a decade now, we are also rapidly evolving our response as an organisation to the current crisis through a three pronged approach:

Mitigate: Mitigate operational and financial risks on the organisation by taking immediate measures to ensure safety and wellbeing of the organisation and the staff.

Adapt: Review existing programs in the light of the crisis to explore ways in which they can be adapted to respond to the current situation, thereby build resilience.

Pivot: Take a mid to long term approach to identify solutions and partnerships that can help establish domain expertise, create relevant assets, and demonstrate sustainable solutions for the ecosystem.

COVID-19 Collaborative

Online Conference on Crisis Management

Presentation on – How NGOs are Responding to the COVID-19 Crisis

4. BUILD

Beyond immediate relief which is seeing an outpouring of support, COVID-19 will have a far-reaching impact on the livelihoods of several labour force segments, particularly in the unorganised sectors, migrant labour, small businesses, and informal entrepreneurs. And no one organisation will be able to provide the solutions to these challenges. We are hence actively engaging with organisations to design solutions that can sustain the existing workforce, while unlocking new livelihood opportunities across urban and rural segments. Our focus is on four largest workforce sections in India – Rural collectives, gig economy entrepreneurs and small businesses, migrant workers in industries such as construction and retail. Beyond livelihoods, we are working closely with healthcare practitioners to identify key focus areas for us to strengthen our public healthcare infrastructure.

If you would like to support re-building efforts, do write to us: covid19response@sattva.co.in

5. SATTVA LIVE – WEBINARS

The immediate impact of the current situation on social purpose organisations is significant. To address some of the pressing questions on managing the current crisis and being able to help those who need it the most, Sattva has also hosted online discussions on relevant topics.

Click here for the presentation from – Sattva Live with CSR Leaders.

Click here for a recording of – Sattva Live with CSR Leaders.

Click here for the presentation from – Sattva Live with NGOs.

Click here for a recording of – Sattva Live with NGOs.

Click here for the presentation from – Sattva Live: Lean M&E

Click here for a recording of – Sattva Live: Lean M&E

Click here for the presentation from – Sattva Live: Tech for Good During COVID-19

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Would you like to know more, or to partner with us? Write in to impact@sattva.co.in.

Gender Equality in India – Women and Digital Solutions

Gender Equality in India – Women and Digital Solutions

– By Angad Bagai, Priyanka Cardoz and Atul Sukumar

Women in India are very often concentrated in certain specific types of industries- about 30% of women-owned enterprises are involved in the manufacturing sector and 18% are involved in retail trade. Looking at the services sector, 24% of women owned enterprises are personal/household service enterprises, 16% are in the education sector and 14% are food service enterprises like restaurants. As discussed in our previous post, there are a variety of barriers faced by these women, and there are multiple approaches that have been used to promote and address these, ranging from programmes driving financial inclusion to the provision of skilling initiatives.

Of the plethora of approaches, the advent of digital technology is one that has brought a range of solution models to the table for creating new, scalable pathways to potentially solve for some of these issues, and generate economic opportunity for women. Internationally, models such as Taobao (Alibaba) and Grab have shown results in linking women to improved livelihood opportunities and markets, while in India, nascent platforms such as Amazon Saheli and GoCoop are looking to do the same and show high potential for market linkages. This piece will look to nuance the understanding of the true potential of digital solutions for women, and how they could be advanced further in India.

You can read the full blog, here.

This is the second in a series we are doing on Gender Equality in India. In this series we intend to look more closely at some specific approaches adopted by stakeholders in the ecosystem to solve these challenges. The first three pieces will focus on promising approaches to how the private sector and corporate interest can engage with the barriers, and the final piece will look at the government and its role in building an enabling environment through policy.

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Priyanka Cardoz is part of our Research Advisory team and is based in our Delhi office. Prior to working with Sattva, she worked as a Consultant for the Evaluation Office, at International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie). Priyanka holds a MDes (Social Design) from Ambedkar University and BA (Philosophy) from St Stephens College, New Delhi.

Angad Bagai is part of our Research Advisory team and is based in our Delhi office. Before Sattva, Angad worked with Cankids…Kidscan, and had a stint as a short-term consultant at the World Bank. Angad has a Bachelor’s degree in International Relations and English Literature from Tufts University and a Master of Laws from the University of Law in London.

Both Priyanka and Angad have been involved with the BMGF Gender engagement since it started, working to establish a Gender Secretariat for strategic research, advisory and knowledge management support for Gates Foundation.

Sattva has been working with various non-profits and social organisations as well as corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. We assist organisations in formulating their long-term social impact strategy by strategically aligning with business to provide meaningful solutions to social issues.

We’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback on this topic. Do write to us: impact@sattva.co.in

Gender Equality in India – Looking Back to Move Forward

Gender Equality in India – Looking Back to Move Forward

– By Priyanka Cardoz & Angad Bagai

Expanding opportunities to women and moving towards gender equality remains integral to the 2030 agenda for Sustainable Development Goals, and to the progress of India as a whole. This is not a purely economic imperative, World Economic Forum research suggests a positive correlation between gender equality and a country’s level of competitiveness, its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita, and even its rank in the Human Development Index. However, women in India today face a variety of significant challenges from both a social and economic lens.

These include inadequate access to inputs and services, including crucial services like healthcare and education, facing normative constraints and socio-cultural barriers which prevent women from not being able to make decisions, and result in mobility and safety constraints, a lack of access to finance, and an inadequate market linkages. A multitude of stakeholders have looked to address these challenges over the last decade, with the government utilising schemes and policy as a lever, and private sector players implementing interventions through CSR and looking to integrate women with the corporate value chain.

A look back reveals that although a variety of programmes have advanced outcomes for women across a range of domains, there is still a need for concerted effort to break the shackle of persistent gender inequities and design targeted solutions which can provide equal opportunities to women. Despite this, it is important to recognise that over the past few years, existing initiatives have been strengthened and innovative interventions have been developed to address these persistent barriers that limit opportunities for women.

You can read the full blog, here.

This is the first in a series we are doing on Gender Equality in India. In our next few pieces, we intend to look more closely at some specific approaches adopted by stakeholders in the ecosystem to solve these challenges. The first three pieces will focus on promising approaches to how the private sector and corporate interest can engage with the barriers, and the final piece will look at the government and its role in building an enabling environment through policy.

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Primary authorship: Priyanka Cardoz & Angad Bagai
Inputs from: Atul Sukumar & Shambhavi Srivastava
Data inputs from: Sansiddha Pani

Priyanka Cardoz is part of our Research Advisory team and is based in our Delhi office. Prior to working with Sattva, she worked as a Consultant for the Evaluation Office, at International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie). Priyanka holds a MDes (Social Design) from Ambedkar University and BA (Philosophy) from St Stephens College, New Delhi.

Angad Bagai is part of our Research Advisory team and is based in our Delhi office. Before Sattva, Angad worked with Cankids…Kidscan, and had a stint as a short-term consultant at the World Bank. Angad has a Bachelor’s degree in International Relations and English Literature from Tufts University and a Master of Laws from the University of Law in London.

Both Priyanka and Angad have been involved with the BMGF Gender engagement since it started, working to establish a Gender Secretariat for strategic research, advisory and knowledge management support for Gates Foundation.

Sattva has been working with various non-profits and social organisations as well as corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. We assist organisations in formulating their long-term social impact strategy by strategically aligning with business to provide meaningful solutions to social issues.

We’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback on this topic. Do write to us: impact@sattva.co.in

Social Stock Exchange – a primer for Indian SPOs

Social Stock Exchange – a primer for Indian SPOs

– by Arpitha Rao

Background
In her budget speech in July 2019, the Indian Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman proposed a Social Stock Exchange (SSE) for social enterprises and voluntary organisations working for social welfare to help them raise capital through debt, equity and mutual funds. The proposed exchange will be under the regulation of Securities and Board Exchange of India (SEBI), will allow the listing of social enterprises and voluntary organisations and will function as an electronic fundraising platform. In September 2019, the SEBI constituted a working group to hone this further under chairman Ishaat Hussain, Director, SBI Foundation.

This news is indicative of a larger shift towards increased mobilisation of domestic capital for social purposes, and reducing India’s dependence on foreign aid. At Sattva, we studied the concept and implications of the SSE, especially in the context of flow of capital for Social Purpose Organisations (SPOs include for-profit social enterprises and non-profit organisations).

We are sharing our early learnings here as an SSE primer and we will follow up with additional insights as the topic evolves.

Current state of India’s social sector
Although India’s social economy is one of the most active in Asia, Indian SPOs continue to suffer from a low volume of deals and small viable pipelines for social enterprises, as well as consistent, long-term fundraising for non-profits. Indian SPOs face obstacles in raising capital to deliver social solutions due to a variety of factors including monitoring and evaluation challenges, lack of standardised methodologies for evaluating organisations, nascent impact investing environment, restricted / reduced funds for organisational growth and so on.

The SSE could improve this situation for Indian SPOs
Some potential scenarios where such an exchange can be leveraged to benefit SPOs include:

  • – Functioning as a search directory listing credible and vetted Social Purpose Organisations
  • – Enabling equity investments for Social Enterprises (institutional/ retail) across all stages of the capital value chain (SMEs to larger organisations)
  • – Enabling issuance of financial instruments like bonds and notes for SPOs
  • – Potential to create a common language around impact assessment and measurement and popularise this with donor ecosystem – both institutional and retail
  • – Potential to increase unrestricted funds for Indian non-profit organisations.

 

Key considerations for the India SSE model:

As the idea is still nascent, with limited clarity on the overall structure of SSE, it is difficult to understand the impact of such a stock exchange on SPOs at this point. However, an SSE model with clarity in the following areas will greatly benefit the players in the ecosystem:

  • – Clear, consistent definition of the terms ‘social enterprise’ and ‘voluntary organisation’: Given the ambiguity around the terms, a critical task for SSE would be to provide standard definitions to determine whether the model will predominantly provide space for non-profits or for-profit organisations. e.g. The inclusion of Section 8 companies in the SSE’s definition of ‘social enterprise’ could lead to well-funded entities also benefiting from this new initiative.
  • – Measurement models that balance financial and social performance to assess SSE listed members: Ms Sitharaman has reiterated that the new SSE will use a rating mechanism which acknowledges the diversity of players in the social space. The rating tool will need to balance multiple indicators to measure and evaluate the performance of SPOs on this new platform. For instance, the appropriate financial performance measures (revenues for Social Enterprises, Operating budgets for NGOs) in the rating process would need to be balanced with social outcomes attributable to the organisations, to assess them on a level scale.
  • – Clarity on how this initiative will interact with the Companies Act: Among other things, Section 135 of the Indian Companies Act mandates companies with revenue of more than INR 50 million to spend 2% of their profits on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) each year. It will be important to have clear guidelines on how CSR funds can be deployed via SSE.
  • – Incentives for participants to drive engagement: Fostering widespread engagement among investors will be vital if NGOs are to raise adequate capital to fund their projects and expand their operations. Some incentives will be important for both market participants willing to invest and SPOs willing to get listed. For example, Investors may need some risk protection mechanisms (through policy and regulatory reforms)

 

What can SPOs do to prepare for SSE
At this early stage of its evolution, it will be important for SPOs to closely follow the developments related to SSE. Some research and thinking on the following areas would be beneficial:

  • – Understand the global frameworks used to assess the impact of organisations; this may give insight into how SEBI could structure the valuation mechanism for the new platform. It is important to understand the mechanisms used by global SSEs such as the Impact Reporting and Investment Standards (IRIS), the Global Impact Investing Rating System (GIIRS) and The B Impact Assessment (BIA).
  • – Explore the feasibility and design of a baseline measurement model to highlight social return on investments, based on a set of quantitative and qualitative indicators. Thinking along these lines for their own organisation’s work, irrespective of the final measurement framework used by the SSE, will be a helpful strategy exercise for SPOs.

 

Next steps
At Sattva, we will be closely following all news related to the SSE, given its enormous potential to impact the Indian social sector. Today, most of the focus in all conversations around SSE and similar exchanges in other countries seem more focussed towards social enterprises. We also see a need to engage with non-profits on this topic to understand their perspective and needs. We hope this article and our other forums of engagement will drive a rich, ongoing dialogue with all ecosystem actors on this critical topic.

Recently, Bangalore Mirror covered SSE in this article, with industry experts weighing in on the topic.

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Arpitha Rao is part of our Transformation Advisory team and is based in our Bangalore office. Her current work focuses on large-scale transformations in public education. Before Sattva, Arpitha has worked with Teach for India, the India Literacy Project, and Greatest Common Factor. She followed up her Engineering degree with a Masters from TISS and an MBA from ISB.

Sattva has been working with various non-profits and social organisations as well as corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. We assist organisations in formulating their long-term social impact strategy by strategically aligning with business to provide meaningful solutions to social issues.

● We’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback on this topic. Do write to us: impact@sattva.co.in