Giving Tuesday India

Giving Tuesday India: Insights into how India gave during Giving Tuesday 2018

#GivingTuesday is a global giving movement that was brought to India in 2017 by GuideStar India, as a celebration during DaanUtsav. In the span of a year, the amount raised through #GivingTuesdayIndia grew seven times to INR 9.03 crore.

The global #GivingTuesday team, GuideStar India, Centre for Social Impact and Philanthropy (CSIP) at Ashoka University, and Sattva Research have collaborated to create data-driven insights on the nature and patterns of giving during #GivingTuesdayIndia.
Sattva_GivingTuesdayIndia
The effort sought:

  • To derive actionable, data-driven insights on the nature of participation during #GivingTuesdayIndia
  • To understand the impact of data collection and sharing on boosting the #GivingTuesdayIndia movement in the country
  • To compare #GivingTuesdayIndia’s data collection and sharing capabilities with those of #GivingTuesdayUSA to recommend ways forward for India
  • Click on the DOWNLOAD link on the left for the full report.

    To explore and better understand the behaviours of India’s givers, contact us today at impact@sattva.co.in.

    A Billion Givers

    Sattva Research is unveiling “Everyday Giving in India”, a first study on the everyday giving ecosystem in India, with the support of Rohini Nilekani Philanthropies and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, with a participatory dialogue on 24th April from 5pm to 9pm in Bangalore.

    A Billion Givers: Harnessing the potential of India’s everyday people for impact, will feature interactive installations and panel discussions on “Strengthening our citizenship muscle: Everyday giving in a participatory democracy” and “Innovation and growth potential of the formal everyday giving market in India”.

    To RSVP, contact Aashika Ravi at aashika.ravi@sattva.co.in

    IT spent Rs 5,091 crore on CSR between 2014 & ’17

    Education is the most favoured choice of Indian IT cos, followed by central govt schemes that get about 14% of CSR money.

    IT firms have spent over Rs 5,091 crore in corporate social spending between 2014 and 2017, said Sattva, a startup that looks at data to measure social impact by companies. Tata Consultancy Services led the spending with over Rs 1,091 crore in the period.

    The government mandates that firms should spend at least 2% of their average net profits made in the preceding three years on CSR. The trend, in terms of geography of spend by IT services firms, differs from the overall trend.

    After pan-India projects, which is the highest in every category (in case of IT firms accounts for half their CSR), overall CSR spend by corporates is concentrated in the Western region.

    In case of IT firms it’s concentrated in the South (1/3rd of their CSR). Education is the most favoured choice of Indian IT companies, followed by central government schemes that get about 14% of CSR money.

    In the category of ‘startups’ (tech/innovation, etc), Sattva found only Chennai-headquartered Zoho Corporation contributing any significant sum to CSR. Zoho has reported CSR spend of Rs 25.5 crore on Zoho University.

    (This article was originally published in Economic Times. All pictures and images, courtesy the publication.)

    The Government is serious about CSR Compliance – Are you?

    Introduction

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) suggests that the responsibility of the for-profits operating within society, is to also contribute towards its economic, social and environmental development and well-being. The core objective of enforcing a CSR mandate is that businesses cannot succeed in isolation, especially when society at large fails to prosper. The Companies Act, 2013 is therefore, a landmark legislation that made India the first country to mandate and quantify CSR expenditure. This move was an attempt by the government to partner with business houses on the national development agenda.

    The Story So Far

    It has been close to 5 years since the government mandated that corporates with :
    ● a net worth of INR 500 cr. or more
    ● or a turnover of INR 1000 cr. or more
    ● or a net profit of INR 5 cr. or more

    in a given financial year, must spend 2 percent (to be calculated as per Section 198 of the Act) of their average net profits on socially relevant projects as defined in Schedule VII of The Companies Act.

    However, even today many corporates eligible for CSR do not contribute to development projects and therefore run a risk of being sent notices for non-compliance and non-conformance of CSR norms.

    While a large chunk of eligible corporates have adopted the mandate as an opportunity to further their corporate citizenship and not just as a tick box activity, there is still a large share of eligible companies who are yet to deploy their CSR funds.

    SocialDisruptors

    SocialDisruptors

    Three years after the law came into existence, that is till 2016-17 – close to half of 19,933 eligible companies have not spent any money as part of their CSR obligations (~9468 companies) and as many as 15,422 companies spent less than the prescribed CSR amount during the same period. In addition to the above citations, there are examples of companies as well who have spent upwards of four times of their prescribed CSR budget in the financial year.

    However, as we see non-compliance has reduced year-on-year. A recent survey published by NGOBOX (
    http://ngobox.org/full-news_CSR-Outlook-Report-by-NGOBOX-analyses-top-359-companies-NGOBOX_22359) revealed interesting insights on CSR compliance among India’s biggest 359 companies which together account for 3/4th of the total CSR spend:

    ● CSR compliance among these companies stood at 93% for the year 2017-18 up 2% points compared to previous year.
    ● Metal, mining and mineral (138%) followed by Oil, Drilling, Lubricants and petrochemicals (104%) sectors emerged as the highest CSR compliant industries followed closely by Auto and Auto ancillaries.

    Government Initiatives/ Steps Towards Compliance

    Things are looking up. The Ministry of Corporate Affairs has also stepped up its effort to encourage corporates to comply with the CSR provisions by setting up:

    ● National CSR Data Portal –The National Corporate Social Responsibility Data Portal is an initiative by the Ministry of Corporate Affairs, Government of India to establish a platform to disseminate Corporate Social Responsibility related data and information filed by the companies registered with it (https://csr.gov.in)

    ● National CSR award – The Ministry of Corporate Affairs has instituted National CSR Award (NCSRA) to recognise CSR for inclusive growth and sustainable development. This Award seeks to recognise the companies that have made a transformative impact on society.

    Along with the initiatives mentioned above, the ministry has also taken a few steps to increase compliance by:

    ● Reconstitution of a high-level committee on Corporate Social Responsibility 2018 (HLC-2018) under the Chairmanship of Secretary, Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) to review the existing framework and guide and formulate the roadmap for a coherent policy on Corporate Social Responsibility.

    ● Centralised Scrutiny and Prosecution Mechanism (CSPM) to promote enforcement of CSR provisions. CSPM has been tasked to start with examination of records of the top 1,000 companies mandated to spend on CSR. The CSPM team of inspectors are issuing show cause notices and prosecution proceedings against non-compliant companies.

    In the latest round, prosecution proceedings against 284 companies and show cause notices against 5,382 companies have already been issued.

    In view of these efforts, it is clear that the government is serious about bringing rigour and strong scrutiny to ensure the CSR law is strictly followed in the near future.

    Current challenges and what Corporate India Can Do

    Corporates often find that they have unutilised funds in the last quarter of the financial year. This could be because of several reasons:

    ● long cycles in identification of impactful projects or/and credible partners
    ● uncertainty on the exact figure of what the total CSR budget may be due to the change in company profit
    ● ambiguity in the legal requirements
    ● difficulties in developing the strategic vision in a multi stake-holder environment
    ● challenges in planning and executing operations through the year

    Some typical avenues that corporate India chooses to disburse its CSR funds are:

    ● Contribution to the Prime Minister’s National Relief Fund
    ● Contribution to CSOs working in the chosen area of focus by the corporate
    ● Contribution to Corporate foundations setup to undertake CSR activities exclusively (Own or External)
    ● Contribution to multi stakeholder platforms founded to address areas of concern.

    Although last minute, it would be imperative for corporates to consider some key points while making their social investment decisions in order to move from a compliance-led CSR function to a more strategic CSR function:

    ● Recognising CSR as a strategic corporate function : CSR law is here to stay. Recognising the strategic and legal significance of CSR and incorporating it into long-term corporate strategy is imperative.
    ● CSR Vision : Alignment and long term commitment to company’s CSR anchor ( focus area/audience/geography ) is key in creating long lasting impact and corporate legacy.
    ● Measure to improve, not prove: A robust monitoring and evaluation mechanism acts well as the steering wheel required to continuously improve CSR interventions and make timely course corrections.
    ● Outcome first: An outcome led approach as against an input led approach goes a long way in establishing the social impact goals the corporate wants to achieve.

    There is a need to fund projects which will not only impact the last mile recipient of the intervention but also bring the culture of empathy and service within the organisation.

    Sattva has been working with various corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals and maximise the return on social investment. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. Several corporates have been a partner to many such collaborations where effective CSR programmes have strategically aligned with business and have provided meaningful solutions to social issues.

    ● To read more about our work with CSR, check:https://bit.ly/2G9g2UZ
    ● Talk to us: impact@sattva.co.in

    Urmi Patil

    Urmi is a part of our Consulting Services team in Mumbai, supporting the design and implementation of CSR projects.

    Before Sattva, she worked in southern Gujarat assisting Ph.D. scholars with their primary research and learning different participatory tools of engagement. She has worked in Government Primary Schools in Uttarakhand for two years where she was able to support schools on processes that improved the learning outcomes of children and enhanced participation of the community members. She has also worked with Mahila Mangal Dals, Yuvak Mangal Dals and Self Help Groups for their capacity building through community-based stakeholder mapping.

    Urmi has a Bachelor of Arts, with Economics Honours from Christ University.

    Shrutee Ganguly

    Shrutee is part of the Consulting Services team, Delhi, and leads engagements with corporate and strategic account clients. She manages a team that works with various implementation partners and NGOs to create long term sustainable impact. Her role demands her to manage customer experience, define strategy and create valuable outcomes in the ecosystem.

    Before Sattva she has had 16+ years in diverse corporate domains – banking, product management and consulting. Her key areas of expertise are Operational Excellence; Process Re-engineering, Programme Management, Coaching, Relationship Management & training. She has worked with senior leaders and operations staff to understand cultural dynamics, manage expectations, streamline processes and deliver results. It is her belief that the social sector needs some of these skills to streamline and structure their efforts to create impact and value. At Sattva, Shrutee has worked with the largest education non-profit in India to co-create models to recognise needs of middle management govt officials who are responsible for the policy and implementation at schools. She also worked closely with the client’s programme team to run pilots and gather relevant inputs from teachers and community on teaching practices, child engagement, good practices and challenges.

    Shrutee is a post graduate in computer applications from Madras University and an IBM certified Lean coach.

    Bobbymon George

    Bobbymon heads Assessments in Sattva and is based in our Bangalore office.

    He has delivered evaluation assignments across sectors and with key CSR accounts such as ABG, JPMorgan, ACC, Philips, L&T Infotech, L&T Financial Services, Dell and Fidelity. He comes with over 13 years of experience in the development sector, across programme design, implementation and Monitoring and Evaluation. He has led Programme Delivery, Curriculum Development, setting up Monitoring & Evaluation frame works and tools in non-profits.

    He is also a master facilitator/trainer in Life Skills.

    Satvika Mahajan

    Satvika provides strategic advise to international clients at Sattva.

    She has also worked with large scale foundations, social enterprises, consortiums and organisations in designing and implementing key strategic solutions and programmes in India.

    Satvika’s foray into this sector began early, when she volunteered part-time with Mr. Maheishgirri (current Member of Parliament) in his political campaign on key health initiatives. She was a founding member of the LSR chapter of the international social entrepreneurship society, Enactus, as a part of which, she enabled farmers to transition from chemical farming to organic farming and helped their wives gain alternative means of livelihood, thereby increasing the average household income. As a Young India Fellow, she worked with a Dalit Youth Advocacy Organisation to help them address key operational challenges and address gaps in effective engagement with the youth. She strives to marry her business knowledge with the social context to achieve impact outcomes. She is dedicated to working with social entrepreneurs to bring innovations to scale

    Satvika is a Young India Fellow (2016) and has a Bachelors in Commerce from Lady Shri Ram College, Delhi

    Garima Goel

    Garima is part of the Transformative Advisory team in Delhi, working with Kaivalya Education Foundation (KEF) on the District Transformation Product for 25 districts.

    Before Sattva she co-founded a sanitation enterprise called “Project Raahat” which is working in the field of urban sanitation in partnership with the government and is currently operational in 3 states. She represented India and Raahat in London and become ‘Enactus World Champion 2017’, chosen among 36 countries. She has also worked with MPs under the MPLAD programme and ran projects in their adopted villages regarding menstrual hygiene and community development. At Sattva she has worked with Central Square Foundation in landscaping the EdTech industry on a programme to drive efficacy and advocacy for country wide implementation by the government. She is committed to inculcating a bottom up method in development solutions to make them community driven.

    Garima did her Bachelors of Management Studies from Shaheed Sukhdev College of Business Studies, with a major in Finance.

    Atul Sukumar

    Atul helps design, build and implement consulting projects as part of the Consulting Services team in Delhi.

    Previously, his experience includes extensive research and analysis on problems of economic policy, education, healthcare, and energy. He has worked as a Data Analyst with the McKinsey Center for Government, a global hub for research, collaboration and innovation in government productivity and performance. He has also worked in consulting organisations, publishing companies, law firms and election campaigns. He is committed to bringing best practices from the private sector to impact public efficiency and effectiveness.

    Atul is a liberal arts graduate of the University of Miami.