Tailored Healthcare Solutions for Tribal Women

Tailored Healthcare Solutions for Tribal Women

16-year old Nirmala weighed 43 kgs and had a haemoglobin level of 5.8 when she was eight months pregnant. Hers was a “high-risk pregnancy”, and after much coaxing over multiple visits by the on-ground health worker she agreed to travel 4 kilometres (2.5 miles) on foot and 11 kilometres (6.8 miles) in a bullock-cart to the nearest hospital for her delivery. She is now the mother of a healthy six-month old boy.

She was lucky; more than half of the maternal deaths in India are among the 8.6% tribal population . Less than 15% of tribal women meet the recommended protocol of ante-natal care . Across the continuum of care, tribal women have poorer access to adequate maternal and child health services than their counterparts elsewhere in India. By increasing access to quality maternal health services and emphasising on two important social determinants of maternal health – literacy and age of marriage – India has succeeded reducing maternal mortality by 77% in the last 19 years.

However, the last leg is the toughest. How do we reach the most marginalised women in remote villages to ensure safe deliveries for them?

Sattva_Insights_TribalHealthcare

There is no data on health, healthcare and finances specific to the 104 million strong tribal population in India, and the budgetary plans and allocations for the tribal population remain buried under “rural healthcare”. Alarmingly, there are no existing institutional mechanisms to even gather or generate such data!

The challenges and needs of the tribal population are unique and need to be addressed differently. Tribal populations suffer from the “triple disease burden”: infections and communicable diseases, non-communicable diseases such as cancer and diabetes, and mental illnesses . The nutritional parameters are poorer: anaemia among tribal women is 38% higher than it is in the non-SC-ST population in India4 and the Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) among tribal children is 20% higher than the national average.

Continued disproportionate health outcomes indicate the need for a different approach to address the maternal health challenges in these communities. To paraphrase American writer and activist Audre Lorde, “it is not our differences that separate us, but our inability to accept and acknowledge them”.

Maternal health services for tribal women need to be tailored to their needs, instead of being replicated naively from modern health practices or relying on monetary incentives to motivate health-seeking behaviour. To improve maternal health outcomes, we need to adopt a three-pronged strategy: provide last-mile access to care, leverage technology to provide better quality care, and increase utilisation of services provided by being more culturally sensitive and building trust in the community.

Solutions to combat poor maternal healthcare Last mile access can be improved through effective community-based care, adequate ante-natal counselling, and provision of emergency transportation services. The Government of Madhya Pradesh, along with UNICEF, piloted a 24×7 Free Referral Transport system for pregnant women (home to facility, inter-facility and drop back) which contributed to the increase in institutional delivery from 47% to 83% in Madhya Pradesh over a five-year period.

We also need to preserve and build beneficial traditional practices by integrating last-mile health workers into the system and focus on safer deliveries – at home or in a health centre.

There is tremendous scope to leverage technology to improve health outcomes. Mobile applications can help identify and track high-risk pregnancies, increase on-ground reach by incentivising field workers, and strengthen the referral chain to make patient data accessible. Tech solutions can conduct point-of-care diagnostic tests, improve the performance of field workers by providing training support and work as job-aids to guide them through complex tasks. Telemedicine centres and electronic medical records also hold great promise.

Through our research, we learnt that tribal communities view pregnancy and childbirth as a natural phenomenon that does not warrant external interventions. Doctors in white coats and sterile, whitewashed, multi-storeyed hospital buildings are viewed as intimidating. Respecting tribal culture and community beliefs, the Society for Education, Action and Research in Community Health (SEARCH) has built a tribal-friendly hospital in Gadchiroli . The clinics are modelled on a typical tribal home with mud flooring and thatched roofs. Outpatient departments feature large, tree-lined open spaces for patients to wait and mingle. To overcome access barriers, the state of Jharkhand established Sahiyya Help Desks in District Hospitals and Community Health Centres to help patients navigate complex, often culturally alien and unfriendly health facilities. Anecdotal evidence suggests that these desks significantly reduce the fear of being misunderstood on account of language and socio-cultural differences and improve awareness of entitlements and services, grievance redressal, and feedback regarding services.

To drive community behaviour change, we need to go beyond acknowledging the distinctiveness of the tribal population and learn to understand their culture and beliefs. We must eschew the cookie-cutter approach that seems to characterise many proposed solutions to this challenge. Tailoring interventions to the needs of tribal people will promote health-seeking attitudes, improve the overall nutritional status and enable better integration. This will facilitate better outcomes for mothers and children.

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This article was originally published in Impact Magazine and can be accessed here.

You can find more Insights from Sattva here.

To talk to us for collaborations or partnerships, you can write to us: impact@sattva.co.in

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i.Name changed to protect identity
ii.India’s maternal mortality rate is 167 per 100,000 live births- Census 2011 data
iii.Tribal Health Expert Committee Report
iv.NHFS-3 data
v.SEARCH website: http://searchforhealth.ngo/tribal-friendly-hospital/

Conservation Research in India – Gaps and Opportunities

Conservation Research in India – Gaps and Opportunities

– By Shrutee Ganguly and Arnab Mukherjee

India, in addition to being a land of incredible biodiversity, is also the second most populous country in the world – housing ~18% of the world’s population with only ~2.5% of global land share. Increasingly, this rapidly growing population coupled with a push for strong economic growth, leading to increased demand for resources, has placed tremendous stress on the natural ecosystems of this country.

Conservation research is essential to enable science-based management of the environment in its myriad forms such as freshwater availability, efficient use of natural resources, air pollution and biodiversity. Research not only impacts the immediate choice of conservation methods but is also expected to influence government policies which in turn has a longer-term impact on the ecosystem.

The Union Government along with NITI Aayog provides the necessary legislation and lays down the thrust areas for conservation research and related initiatives in the country. Relevant line ministries (such as Ministry of Water Resources, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Agriculture etc) draw up missions, schemes and programmes along the lines of which specific projects are conceived and funds allocated. The state governments also allocate funds for conservation related initiatives through relevant departments such as the forest department and water resources department. Together, the Union and State Governments provide the lion’s share of financial assistance for conservation effort in the country.

Yet, for NGOs looking to conduct research in conservation, this source of funds remains largely inaccessible.

There is a growing perception in the NGO world that the government metes out preferential treatment to the autonomous institutes and central universities, given that they are funded by the government. Government officials however deny any such preference and point towards various factors such as quality of proposals, NGO capability and so on as the key reason for this apparent bias. Hence, international grants from donors such as US Fish and Wildlife Service, Rufford Foundation, IUCN, GEF and others continue to be the lifeline of most NGOs.

Increasing number of corporates are looking to fund environment projects, largely in areas such as waste management, rainwater harvesting and funding flagship government schemes such as Namami Gange. Conservation efforts however continue to remain low on the priority list of most corporates hence meagre amount of CSR funds are allotted to it if at all. There are some notable exceptions such as Godrej, DHL, NSE and Jet Privilege. In addition, corporates prefer quicker returns or visible validation of impact and hence focus more on implementation projects as opposed to research.

Our view is that allocation of CSR funds for conservation research requires a shift in corporate vision from immediate or short-term returns to a more longer-term strategic perspective where a study on a specific aspect of conservation is followed up with on-ground implementation.

The situation, however, is not as desperate as it appears for NGOs. Through extensive research and client engagement, Sattva recognises the following areas that can be leveraged to function successfully within the existing conservation ecosystem.

Fig 1. Five levers to create competitive advantage in the conservation research space

Sattva, through its experience in the environment space has emerged as a trusted advisor for corporates and organisations. Over the years, Sattva has developed multiple models of engagement to support sustainable solutions on the ground for maximum impact.

Fig 2. Sattva models of engagement

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Sattva has been working with various corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals and maximise the return on social investment. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. Several corporates have been a partner to many such collaborations where effective CSR programmes have strategically aligned with business and have provided meaningful solutions to social issues.

● To read more about our work with CSR, check: https://www.sattva.co.in/our-work/
● Talk to us: impact@sattva.co.in

Digital Solutions for Women-Owned Enterprises

Digital Solutions for Women-Owned Enterprises

Background

A decline in rural jobs, the one-sided burden of unpaid care work, along with other structural and underlying issues, such as unequal pay structures, have compounded the decreasing female labour force participation of India—56.1% of working women in India were self-employed as of 2014. There are 8.1 million Indian women-owned enterprises as per the 6th EC, making up 13.7% of enterprises in India. Only 20% of these report their Gross Value Added (GVA) as over INR 5,000 per month compared to 73% of men-owned enterprises.

There are multiple different approaches that have been used to promote and address the variety of barriers faced by women-owned enterprises, ranging from programmes driving financial inclusion to the provision of skilling initiatives. Of the plethora of different approaches to solving for these barriers, e-commerce and digital solutions offer a new and potentially scalable pathway to potentially solve for some of these issues and generate market linkages for these women-owned enterprises. Digital solutions are only just beginning to be explored in India and could provide a scalable means of linking women to markets and job opportunities. The effect size of such interventions (both in India and internationally) could extend beyond market connections and livelihood linkages, to providing layered social empowerment outcomes.

Sattva_Woman-market-india

Sattva organised a roundtable to understand this potential through three lenses — the viability of e-commerce as a solution, the enablers it provided that could solve for specific barriers, and the feasibility of implementing such a solution at scale. ‘Digital Solutions for Women-Owned Enterprises’ takes forward the insights from the roundtable to better understand the potential of e-commerce in growing women entrepreneurship.

Key Findings

1. The high potential of B2B e-commerce
The B2B customer segment of e-commerce offers high potential for women-owned enterprises to access markets and scale as it helps producers procure bulk amounts of raw materials at a lower cost, and have larger order sizes and more predictable revenue.

2. Three B2C sectors with opportunity
Three sectors in B2C e-commerce provide maximum potential for integration of women-owned enterprises. These are:

  • Sale and manufacture of apparel and home furnishing
  • Retail sale of food and beverages
  • Hyperlocal services like hairdressing and beauty services, or repair and alteration of clothing

3. E-commerce enables enterprises in multiple ways
E-commerce platforms can enable enterprises to access larger markets, understand market dynamics and tailor their products/services, get easier access to credit and other inputs, and improve their technical and business skills.

4. There are five key enablers that need to be provided or developed in order to ready women for integration into e-commerce

  • Willingness to participate in e-commerce
  • Functional and technical skills
  • Access to and usage of mobiles and technology
  • Market intelligence and business support
  • Access to working capital and inputs

5. Similarly, there are five enablers required to achieve readiness at an ecosystem level

  • Developing infrastructure in partnership with telecom providers
  • Creating a favourable policy and regulation environment
  • Adding a gender lens for e-commerce platforms
  • Reducing entry barriers on e-commerce platforms
  • Facilitating technological access for women (by developing familial and community support)

The full report can be accessed below.
Digital Solutions for Women-Owned Enterprises – Full Report

Our research shows that even though the e-commerce sector in India is experiencing major growth, the effects of e-commerce growth have been concentrated amongst a few of the larger vertical and horizontal players, with the bottom of the pyramid not yet having any real benefits.

There are a few industries that show high promise for women entrepreneurs to integrate with e-commerce value chains, such as; restaurants/online food delivery, groceries, and the manufacture of textiles and home furnishings. Additionally, the operational models of e-commerce platforms provide a host of enablers that address the constraints faced by women entrepreneurs and women-owned enterprises, building a solid market case for the potential of incorporating women into these value chains. However, in order to truly incorporate women into these value chains, there is a need for mentorship, hand-holding support, financial and digital literacy and technical guidance to be provided. Further, there is also a need for infrastructure to be strengthened, a supportive environment to be developed (by addressing normative and social constraints as well as by enterprises providing support). Favourable government policies towards e-commerce growth, like we’ve seen in other countries such as China, and enabling its decentralized access are also necessary for these women entrepreneurs to thrive in parallel with the rapidly growing e-commerce space.

Would you like to partner with us to further the conversation around the potential of e-commerce in growing women entrepreneurship? Write in to knowledge@sattva.co.in.

Scaling Social Impact through Organisational Capacity Building

Scaling Social Impact through Organisational Capacity Building

The discourse around social impact organisations, more often than not, includes the need to achieve scale. One side of the coin is the denominator or the scale at which the social problem exists, and the breadth that needs to be covered to solve the problem. The other side of the coin is the organisation’s capability – both in terms of quality and quantity – to achieve the requisite scale. Simply put, scaling up both programmes as well as organisations to achieve the desired impact in the ecosystem go hand-in-hand.

Non-profit leaders will concur that scale means different things to different organisations. It depends, among other things, on the problem they are trying to solve, the geographies where the problem persists, and the beneficiaries they are focusing on based on their theory of change. Accordingly, the pathways to scale differ as well. There can therefore be no cookie-cutter approach to scaling up for impact.

Sattva’s decade-long experience of engaging with non-profits of different sizes and maturity levels has however, helped us identify a key tenet – organisational capacity building – which when customised, can enable an organisation to become ‘scale up ready’. There are multiple components to this exercise, and our experience says that every non-profit that wishes to scale requires one or more of these.

Sattva_Insights_ScalingSocialImpact

  • Re-alignment of Mission and Vision: Before embarking upon the creation of a scale-up strategy, non-profits caught in the throes of growth need to relocate their North Star. This holds true even for large scale mature non-profits who have been in the ecosystem for ages. For instance, Sattva helped a 40-year old organisation working on child welfare to re-create the mission of the organisation in the context of the larger vision, which then enabled them to focus on depth of impact, instead of spreading themselves too thin to achieve breadth alone.

  • Development of Fundraising Strategy: The ability to create impact is contingent upon the non-profit’s ability to stay in business and scale, which in turn is largely dependent on the availability of funding. A robust fundraising strategy is therefore very important for any non-profit. Sattva has worked with diverse organisations across various sectors, and some as old as 20 years, to develop a deep understanding of what makes fundraising strategies work. It often starts with conducting fundraising diagnostics to understand past performance, which feeds into new fundraising strategies that define target funder segments, key value propositions and critical success factors. This is then further reinforced by building fundraising capacity of the organisation across people, processes, messaging and networks.

  • Restructuring of organisations (Systems, Processes, People) and Change Management: As organisations grow to scale their impact, their people and processes need to accommodate the changes that come with scale. Sattva has encountered examples of large organisations which have scaled to 400+ districts in India while holding on to centralised decision-making structures, resulting in bottlenecks across the organisation. The solutions in such instances have included developing a second line of leadership to decentralise decision-making, organisational restructuring to create new departments and restructure existing ones, developing standard operating procedures for old and new processes, developing capacity building plans for people, and creating change management plans to help these changes percolate across roles and ranks within the organisation.

  • Developing Scale-up Blueprints and Products for Programs of organisations: Growing an organisation and its programmes requires various strategies and levers. Sattva has demonstrated that standardising blueprints for scale and developing innovative products can enable organisations to implement their programmes at scale. Designing programmes and processes, building monitoring and evaluation frameworks for measuring effectiveness and efficiency of programmes, and using technology as an enabler to scale programmes have been some of tried and tested ways in which we have enabled organisations to scale their programmes and impact, the most shining testimony of which has been an education non-profit which grew its programme from 4 to 13 states in the country in 3 years.
  • Since the need of each organisation on its pathway to scale is unique, the solutions have to be customised as well. Programme and organisational diagnostics to understand the gaps that need filling, custom-made strategies to address the specific requirements of an organisation, and implementation support on an organisation’s scale-up journey are, therefore, all integral cogs for enabling an organisation to achieve the scale that is necessary to create the intended impact. While externalities like regulatory environment and availability of funding may limit the growth of organisations at times, organisational capacity building can help overcome some of the challenges associated with becoming ‘scale up ready’.

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    Sattva has been working with various non-profits and organisations to help them define their social impact goals and optimise their capacity building efforts. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions.

    ● To read more about our work, check: https://www.sattva.co.in/our-work/
    ● Talk to us: impact@sattva.co.in

    Parvathy Ramanathan

    Parvathy leads the Transformation Advisory Services portfolio at Sattva, where we focus on enabling ambitious organisations achieve their highest impact. In addition, she also leads Sattva’s technology CSR Programme Management product – SHIFT.

    Parvathy has worked extensively in both the US and India at the intersection of systemic transformation and technology, in sectors including Government, Healthcare and Education.

    Parvathy is an entrepreneurial leader, now focused on solving urgent problems in the development sector, leveraging over 18 years of global experiences in strategy, marketing, product innovation, services delivery and business development. She has launched, generated and managed global revenue streams across products and services. Her leadership roles range from Accel-Partners funded Big Data Analytics start- up to Fortune-500 firms like Amazon, IQVIA and McGraw-Hill. Her experience spans sectors including Government, Healthcare, Financial Services, Education and Retail.

    Parvathy has an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management and a Bachelors in Engineering from RAIT, Mumbai University.

    Shaivi Chandavarkar

    Shaivi is a Senior Consultant based in our Mumbai office. She works in CSR Advisory and is currently focused on a project to build the paediatric liver transplants ecosystem in India and the tribal maternal health space. She brings with her a diversity of experience in strategy consulting, project management, business development and marketing communications in healthcare projects.

    Prior to Sattva, Shaivi worked in healthcare consulting with IQVIA in Singapore, was the Medical Project Lead for a multi-specialty hospital in Mumbai – Namaha Healthcare (voted #1 Emerging Hospital in India by TOI in 2017) and worked in healthcare communication with DDB Remedy. She is also the founder of a non-profit Swasyah, to conduct camps to identify undiagnosed patients and direct them to appropriate health care.

    Shaivi is a physical therapist by training from Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai. She also has an MA in Economics from SNDT University and an MBA from INSEAD.

    Business Case for Gender Mainstreaming in Cotton in Maharashtra

    Business Case for Gender Mainstreaming in Cotton in Maharashtra

    Background

    India is the largest producer and second largest exporter of cotton in the world, providing direct livelihood to 6 million farmers, and indirect livelihood to about 40-50 million people employed in cotton trade and processing.

    Women perform a majority of the tasks involved in cotton cultivation, but play a limited part in agricultural decision-making, have low involvement in market-facing roles and little control over profits. Typically, women cultivators don’t have land titles in their name, and are often ignored stakeholders in farm-related interventions. They also have reduced access to agronomic training programs and information, and agriculture extension services provided by the government.

    To further understand the potential of women cotton cultivators in driving improved business outcomes and profitability in cotton production, Sattva and IDH The Sustainable Trade Initiative conducted a gender analysis of cotton cultivation in the Vidarbha and Marathwada regions of Maharashtra between September 2018 and January 2019. This included exploring and quantifying the gender division of roles, responsibilities and access to resources, current farm practices, and the labour burden of male and women cultivators in the production process. The study sought to understand current gaps in cotton production and identify opportunities that could enable ecosystem players, cotton value chain actors, businesses, and programme implementers to make well-founded decisions based on a business case for strengthening the involvement of women cultivators.

    Key Findings

    1. Social norms impact the way women cultivators engage with the agricultural ecosystem

    • Tasks undertaken by women cotton cultivators are perceived to be ‘lighter work’, even though these tasks are highly manual, drudgery-prone and time intensive.
    • Women cultivators spend more farming days (80-90%) on the field compared to men (10-20%) through the cotton production cycle. In addition, women cultivators spend 8 additional hours engaged in household tasks daily. While household responsibilities are unpaid, the economic contribution of women cultivators on their own field also goes unmeasured.
    • Social norms limit mobility and the ability of women cultivators to take on front-facing, ‘high value’ roles. They also limit access to productive resources such as land, extension services, tools and finance, that are relatively easier to access for their male counterparts.
    • Women cultivators were typically paid INR 150 per day and men were paid INR 200-300 per day. Lower levels and reduced control over income limit the level of empowerment women cultivators can achieve.

    2. Tasks undertaken by women cultivators directly impact the quantity and quality of cotton produced

    3. The time spent by women on the field can be leveraged to implement integrated pest management

    • While engaged in weeding and fertilizer application, women are on the field during the early schedule of pest monitoring (June to September)
    • The time spent by women cultivators on the field can be leveraged to monitor for pests and reduce the incidents of pest attacks


    4. Though women undertake majority of the tasks in cotton production, primary decision-making still lies in the hands of male cultivators.

    • Women cultivators were more likely to say that decisions were made by both men and women. Male responses for the decision-making category ‘both’ are consistently 8-10% points lower than women’s responses.
    • Even when decisions were taken together, there could be varying degrees of participation by the women cultivators. The final decision was almost always taken by the male member of the household.


    5. Despite their role in cotton production, women cultivators have limited access to resources.

    • 33% of the women cultivators had attended any training in the last two years. Yet, if training was provided to women, there was a 30-40% increase in adoption of best farm practices.
    • 16% of the women cultivators surveyed held land titles in their name.
    • 15% of the women cultivators surveyed had accessed any government schemes, with lack of knowledge cited as the main limiting factor
    • SHGs remain an un-leveraged source of financial support for cotton. While most farmers depended on store credit, only 28% of the women cultivators shared that they get credit for cotton from SHGs.

    The study found that solving for the restrictions and challenges faced by women cotton cultivators has the potential to achieve improved business outcomes, including an increase in the quality and quantity of cotton produced, ultimately increasing household incomes. It also results in better social outcomes such as increased participation of women cotton cultivators in decision making.

    The full report can be accessed below.
    Business Case for Gender Mainstreaming in Cotton in Maharashtra – Full Report

    Approach and Framework

    The gender analysis framework developed by Sattva helped build an understanding of the gender division of roles and responsibilities on the farm, participation in decision-making, and access to productive resources. The framework also analyzes the underlying gender and socio-cultural norms which could influence the division of roles and access to ecosystem support. The study is the first to build a business case for gender mainstreaming in the agricultural value chain.

    Using quantitative and qualitative research methods, the study sought to answer the following questions:

    • What is the role played by women cultivators in the production of cotton and how does it contribute to the quality and quantity of the cotton produced?
    • How can business outcomes in cotton production be strengthened by enhancing the engagement of women cultivators on the farm?
    • How are women’s roles on the farm influenced by underlying gender norms? How can these norms be influenced or changed to improve and enhance women’s outputs and profitability?
    • What is the current ecosystem around women cultivators? How can it be strengthened to influence the contribution of women cultivators in cotton production?

    Methodology

    methodology

    The study included quantitative surveys 515 women cotton cultivators and 164 male cotton cultivators. 19 focus group discussions were held with over 125 respondents across Amravati, Yavatmal, Aurangabad and Parbhani, while qualitative interviews were conducted with 26 relevant stakeholders including NGOs, Farmer Producer Organizations (FPOs), ginners, brands and experts in the field.

    Event: Farmer Incomes’ and Gender Mainstreaming in Cotton Cultivation

    IDH The Sustainable Trade Initiative unveiled the ‘Business Case for Gender Mainstreaming in Cotton in Maharashtra’ with knowledge partners Sattva in Mumbai on May 9. The event featured the launch of two reports ‘Doubling Cotton Farmer Incomes in Maharashtra’ and ‘Business Case for Gender Mainstreaming in Cotton in Maharashtra ’, followed by an interactive session on key findings from the reports.

    Would you like to partner with us to further the conversation around gender mainstreaming in the agriculture value chain? Write in to knowledge@sattva.co.in.

    CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: A (NON-CLICHE) PRIMER

    CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: A (NON-CLICHE) PRIMER

    Sattva_Insights_CSR-Primer1

    It has been six years since the 2013 CSR law mandated certain companies to start spending a stipulated amount towards social responsibilities. While compliance and implementation have been getting streamlined with each passing year, there are many questions that are asked by the curious: Which corporates have the most impactful CSR programme? What is a typical CSR cycle, from genesis to completion? What makes a good CSR programme? Why do some programmes fail? What has been the impact of India Inc. CSR in the last 5 years? Who are the biggest beneficiaries of CSR? Where are the biggest gaps today in CSR in terms of demand and supply?

    Since 2009, we at Sattva have worked with 70+ corporates on their CSR programmes in a multitude of capacities: To define the CSR strategy of a company, to on-board the most relevant partners, to measure impact of existing CSR programmes, to audit programmes, to design employee volunteering programmes and to be strategic advisors and partners to the CSR unit as a whole.

    As an organisation that has been in the space for the last ten years, what have been our biggest learnings? And how are those learnings helping to shape our CSR practice this year?

    1. The range in the CSR maturity cycle is large: While some have set systems and are pivoting towards innovation in their programmes, some still don’t have their focus areas/strategies defined.
    While mature, corporate giving organisations such as the Tata Group, Reliance Industries and L&T have developed internal processes and standards to execute corporate giving, the ecosystem by and large is still in the process of developing standard practices and processes to execute effective CSR. Even today, many CSR functions share resources with other functions such as Legal, Finance, Marketing or HR. Many companies still lack a dedicated CSR team. Institutes like Indian Chamber of Commerce have started courses on CSR. However, in our view, knowledge is yet to be standardised across organisations, systems and programmes.

    2. Six years into the law, many CSR teams are looking to make data-based portfolio strategy and fund allocation decisions, to ensure highest impact from their CSR investments.
    Based on Sattva’s analysis and projections, the market for CSR has the potential to unlock more than INR 30,000 crore by 2021. As companies grow and become compliant under the law, the need to identify focus areas and regions, and subsequently, to find implementation partners for their CSR programmes will increase. But the existing ecosystem does not support effective matchmaking between NGOs and corporates based on their CSR focus. Companies are also struggling to identify what sectors to focus on that align well with their strengths – in terms of the products and services they provide.

    According to the annual State of CSR report by KPMG,44% per cent of the companies have reported a delay in implementation or exploring opportunities as their reasons for not being able to comply with the law, or having spent less than the prescribed amount on CSR in 2017-2018.

    3. There is an increasing focus on outcomes and impact created, along with compliance to spend the required amount by the CSR law.
    Though the law does not mandate reporting of numbers of people benefitted, it is heartening to see that more and more companies have started to report on people impacted in their CSR reports.

    Sattva_Insights_CSR-Primer2
    (Source: IDR Online)

    However, companies are often still confused between output and outcomes. It is not merely enough to evaluate the success of their CSR programmes on the basis of number of people impacted, but it is also important to know what kinds of change their programmes created on -the ground, in the mid-term and long-term.

    How can Sattva help?
    • As CSR cycles are maturing, the focus is now on making programmes more efficient. We are excited to announce that Sattva has developed its technology platform SHIFT, that we envision to be the fulcrum of our CSR advisory services. We have channelled years of CSR experience advising clients on their programme design, implementation, management and evaluation into this innovative technology platform to help corporates and NGOs translate their intent into real on-ground impact. We will cover SHIFT in more detail in our next volumes of this CSR compendium.

    • Sattva’s proprietary CSR framework has been developed to address this lacuna. Over the last 5 years, we’ve used this framework to help 30+ clients define their CSR strategies, focus areas and programmes thereof [We will cover this is in further detail in our next volumes]
    Sattva_Insights_CSR-Primer

    • India Data Insights (IDI) is Sattva’s in-house data visualisation platform to guide corporates make informed decisions while building programmes – a snapshot from the IDI platform below:
    Sattva_Insights_CSR-Primer3
    (Source: India Data Insights – Geographies and CSR Spend v/s Poverty Rate)

    This is a foreword to a 24- part annual compendium that will be published over the course of the next 12 months.

    Sattva has been working with various corporate clients to help them define their social impact goals and maximise the return on social investment. Our focus is to solve critical problems and find scalable solutions. Several corporates have been a partner to many such collaborations where effective CSR programmes have strategically aligned with business and have provided meaningful solutions to social issues.

    ● To read more about our work with CSR, check: https://bit.ly/2G9g2UZ
    ● Talk to us: impact@sattva.co.in

    Giving Tuesday India

    Giving Tuesday India: Insights into how India gave during Giving Tuesday 2018

    #GivingTuesday is a global giving movement that was brought to India in 2017 by GuideStar India, as a celebration during DaanUtsav. In the span of a year, the amount raised through #GivingTuesdayIndia grew seven times to INR 9.03 crore.

    The global #GivingTuesday team, GuideStar India, Centre for Social Impact and Philanthropy (CSIP) at Ashoka University, and Sattva Research have collaborated to create data-driven insights on the nature and patterns of giving during #GivingTuesdayIndia.
    Sattva_GivingTuesdayIndia
    The effort sought:

  • To derive actionable, data-driven insights on the nature of participation during #GivingTuesdayIndia
  • To understand the impact of data collection and sharing on boosting the #GivingTuesdayIndia movement in the country
  • To compare #GivingTuesdayIndia’s data collection and sharing capabilities with those of #GivingTuesdayUSA to recommend ways forward for India
  • Click on the DOWNLOAD link on the left for the full report.

    To explore and better understand the behaviours of India’s givers, contact us today at impact@sattva.co.in.

    Shambhavi Srivastava

    Shambhavi is a Senior Research Manager at Sattva and brings in 8 years of experience in research and public policy projects in the sectors of rural livelihoods, women’s economic empowerment and financial inclusion. Shambhavi brings with her strong expertise in quantitative and qualitative research methods using mixed-method approaches, statistical tools and experience with leading outreach and dissemination activities on the field and in the ecosystem. She has served as a Principal Investigator (PI) on numerous gender, public health, financial inclusion and rural livelihood projects.

    Prior to Sattva, Shambhavi worked as Research Manager for Institute of Financial Management and Research (IFMR LEAD), India where she served as the PI and programme lead for policy projects in the Financial Inclusion vertical on multi-stakeholder projects in collaboration with partners such as DFID, Access Assist, SIDBI, Ministry of Finance and the University of Munich.

    Shambhavi holds a Master of Arts degree in Cultural and Social Geography from the University of British Columbia, Canada, a Master of Arts Degree in International Relations and Political Science from Jawaharlal Nehru University, India and a Bachelors in Political Science from Lady Shriram Delhi University, India.